About Drug Law Reform Australia

Drug Law Reform Australia exists to raise awareness of the ongoing harm being done to our young people, families, democratic institutions and Australian society in general, by the current harm maximising drug laws.

We recognise that drug use can be dangerous and that problematic drug use is a health concern, however, criminalising drug users causes more harm than good. 

For better or for worse

The fact is drugs are part of Australian life. Millions of Australians drink alcohol regularly, for better or worse. Millions of Australians smoke cigarettes, for better or worse. Millions of Australians have been prescribed anti-depressants just to get through the day, for better or worse. Even our children are being prescribed Ritalin and other drugs to modify their ‘anti-social’ behaviour, for better or worse.

Whatever the reason, why is it that some drugs are regulated, controlled, taxed and freely available to those over 18 years of age, and some aren’t?

Drug prohibition criminalises ordinary Australians

Why is it that more than 2 million Australians are technically criminals because they smoke cannabis, instead of drinking alcohol?

Why is it OK that some drugs are legal, regulated, controlled,  taxed and available to those over 18 years of age and yet others are made illegal and the people that use them criminals?

At Drug Law Reform Australia, we believe that these vitally important issues don't get anywhere near the attention they deserve from our lawmakers.

Our aim is to reinvigorate the drug policy debate and put drug law reform back on the political agenda. 


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  • commented 2016-06-28 18:18:41 +1000 · Flag
    Like Sonja Christine Schulz I would also like to know the party position re vaccinations. do you share your candidates personal position?
  • commented 2016-06-27 23:14:18 +1000 · Flag
    What is DLR’s position on the No Jab No Play policy? I happen to know a lot of cannabis activists who have left HEMP due to their shared ticket with SEX Party and the fact that SP are very much for NJNP policy.
    You are in a position to bring these people over to DLR if you made a statement in support of true informed consent and protection of people’s human rights and took a stand against NJNP policy. I have spoken to some of your candidates who are very against NJNP but would like to know the party’s official position please.
  • commented 2016-06-27 11:45:21 +1000 · Flag
    You got my vote. 👍
  • commented 2016-06-08 20:47:34 +1000
    I’ve only just discovered the Drug Law Reform Australia Party today and want to say a big “thank you” to Greg Chipp for starting this party.

    I’ve always intuitively felt that prohibition has caused more problems than it’s resolved and the more I’ve researched it, the more my intuition has been validated.

    My biggest concerns with prohibition:

    -it treats people with addictions as low-life criminals rather than acknowledging them as human beings suffering with a health problem that are in need of compassion and support, which makes recovery far less attainable for them and increases their chances of dealing drugs themselves to get by.

    -all drugs carry an element of risk so it’s vital that they are regulated to make them as safe for the communities as possible.

    -whilst drugs are illegal, they create a black market and criminal gangs that control the supplies, which are ever evolving to be more and more violent so that they can maintain control of the supply.

    -whilst drugs are in the hands of violent, criminal gangs, the drug supplies will continue to become more potent, more dangerous (i.e. unknown compounds) and more readily available to children and young people, as well as other vulnerable groups of people in society (e.g. the homeless).

    -these violent gangs grow into such large and well resourced organised crime operations that they become way too influential over other legitimate systems in our societies. This opens up the potential for corruption at every corner.

    -prohibition started for flawed and racist political reasons. There were many misconceptions about drugs themselves at the time when prohibition began.

    -the money being spent on this unachievable goal of eradicating drugs could be better spent on recovery or other welfare issues (e.g investing more in the already under-resourced hospitals).

    -the police time being spent on fighting the drug war could be better spent on other problematic areas of society (e.g. domestic violence).

    -prohibition is the controversial idea, not drug decriminalisation and legalisation, as prohibition leads to a dangerous and harmful world that creates cycles of despair and destruction. Decriminalisation and legalisation of drugs would lead to a less violent and more predictable life with better health outcomes.

    I’m a social worker by day, but it’s my life’s mission to see an end to prohibition and I’m willing to do whatever it takes for our politicians to see reason in why it’s so important for us to end prohibition as soon as possible.

    Thanks again for starting the Drug Law Reform Australia Party. I look forward to hearing from more from like-minded people.

    Mike
  • commented 2016-05-21 08:47:06 +1000
    I love the free Cannabis campaign. Good Luck and I reckon you guys will get elected.
  • followed this page 2014-10-22 00:11:22 +1100
  • posted about this on Facebook 2014-08-25 07:19:16 +1000
    About Drug Law Reform Australia Party

Federal Election 2016

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July 2, 2016

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